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Category: Cocktail Recipe

Shipwreck Cocktail Recipe

Ingredients

1 oz bourbon
1 oz aged rum
3/4 oz lime juice
3-4 dashes Bittercube Jamaican #1 bitters
Garnish: Mint sprig

Steps

  1. Combine ingredients, except bitters, in a shaker with ice.
  2. Shake to chill.
  3. Strain in a highball glass over ice.
  4. Top with bitters.
  5. Garnish with mint sprig.

History

With some basis in the daiquiri family of cocktails, the base of the drink is rum and lime juice. The addition of bourbon and bitters by Jamal Hassan brings some depth and complexity to the flavor profile. Regardless of its origins, this cocktail is a perfect summer sipper.

Sazerac Cocktail Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/2 oz Rye whiskey
1/4 oz Absinthe
One sugar cube or a dash of simple syrup
3 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
Garnish: Lemon peel

Steps

  1. Rinse an old fashioned glass with absinthe.
  2. Add ice to glass.
  3. Stir whiskey, sugar, and bitters together over ice.
  4. Discard ice in glass and strain drink into glass.
  5. Garnish with lemon peel.

History

There are few drinks more synonymous with a location than the Sazerac with New Orleans. Most historians accredit the Sazerac cocktail to Aaron Bird who took over the Merchants Exchange Coffee House in 1850. He began serving a drink of cognac imported by the previous owner of the bar, and bitters made by local apothecary Antoine Peychaud. In 1870, a new ownerThomas Handy began using whiskey due to cognac shortages. The cocktail was first recorded in 1908 in The Words Drinks and How to Mix them by William T Boothby.

Brooklyn Cocktail Recipe

Ingredients

2 ounces rye whiskey
1 ounce dry vermouth
1/4 ounce maraschino liqueur
2 dashes Alpino bitters
Garnish: Luxardo maraschino cherry

Steps

  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.

  2. Stir until well chilled.

  3. Strain into chilled coupe glass

  4. Garnish with maraschino cherry.

History

The Brooklyn first appeared in Jack’s Manual in 1908, and was made popular by Jacob Grohusko who was the head bartender at Baracca’s Restaurant on Wall Street. While it drinks similarly to a Manhattan, it has remained relatively obscure since prohibition until recently, mainly due to the use of Amer Picon bitters, which are difficult to find in the US. For our version, we’ve substituted the Alpino bitters, which gives the drink a similar and yet distinct flavor to the original Brooklyn.

XYZ Cocktail Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/2 ounces dark rum
3/4 ounces orange liqueur (we recommend Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao)
3/4 ounces fresh lemon juice
1 dropper of Crude Bitters The Lindsay
Garnish: slice of lime

Steps

  1. Combine all ingredients except bitters in a shaker.

  2. Shake vigorously.

  3. Strain into chilled cocktail glass

  4. Top with bitters.

History

The XYZ was the name first given to the Rum Sidecar when it appeared in the Savoy Cocktail Book published in London in 1930. While the original recipe called for white rum, many variants have introduced a dark rum over the years. The introduction of bitters in our variant creates an herbal and slightly spicy flavor profile you're sure to enjoy.

Nor’Easter Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/2 ounce bourbon
1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
1/2 ounce maple syrup
Ginger beer
1 dropper of Crude Bitters The Lindsay
Garnish: slice of lime

Steps

  1. Combine all ingredients except bitters in a shaker.

  2. Shake vigorously.

  3. Serve in rocks glass over ice.

  4. Top with ginger beer and bitters.

  5. Garnish with slice of lime.

History

The Nor'Easter was originally created by Sean Josephs. It was served at his bbq restaurants. Maysville and Char No. 4 (both now closed) as a spicy-sweet bourbon cocktail to complement the food. Clearly given it's flavorful past, we'd recommend it next to a plate of slow smoked pork, but we'll let you decide on your sides.

Southern Toast Recipe

Ingredients

1/4 ounce Luxardo Maraschino Liquer
2 ounces dark rum
1/4 ounce simple syrup
3 dashes The Bitter Bottle Chocolate Cherry Bark bitters
Garnish: Strip of orange peel

Steps

  1. Pour maraschino liqueur into rocks glass.

  2. Tilt glass and rotate gently to coat inside of glass. Pour out excess.

  3. Combine rum, simple syrup and bitters in mixing glass. Stir.

  4. Pour into prepared glass over large piece of ice.

  5. Garnish with orange peel and stirrer.

History

The Southern Toast was created at the Bird and Bone in Miami, FL. It is meant to be a rum forward twist on the classic old fashioned. The Maraschino liqueur provides the fruity notes to the drink instead of using any actual fruit. While Bird and Bone created the cocktail to feature a Trinidad rum called Afrohead, you can really use any darker aged rum.

Campfire Sling Recipe

Ingredients

2 ounces bourbon or rye
1/4oz Maple Syrup
3 dashes the Bitter Bottle Chocolate Cherry Bark Bitters
Garnish: Flamed orange peel

Steps

  1. Add all the ingredients into a cocktail glass with ice, and stir until well-chilled.
  2. Squeeze orange peel and spritz into cocktail.
  3. Take match and flame orange peel over glass.
  4. Garnish with flamed orange peel.

History

Looking to warm up as the weather cools down? The Campfire Sling is a variant on the Old Fashioned cocktail, using maple syrup instead of simple syrup created by Kevin Felker at the Water Grill in downtown Los Angeles. Garnish with a flamed orange peel to add a touch of smokiness that makes you feel like you’ve sipping the cocktail in your favorite camp chair around a fire.

Oxacan Old Fashioned Recipe

Ingredients

1 ½ ounces reposado tequila
½ ounce mezcal
1 teaspoon agave nectar
1 dash Bitters Lab Aromatic bitters
Garnish: Strip of orange peel

Steps

  1. Add handful of ice to cocktail shaker.
  2. Combine all liquids into cocktail shaker.
  3. Stir until well chilled.
  4. Strain into cocktail class filled with ice.
  5. Take orange peel, squeezing oil into cocktail.
  6. Garnish with orange peel.

History

The Oaxacan Old Fashioned was invented in 2007 in New York City, by the tequila specialist Philip Ward at Death & Co. Since it's invention, it has become a quick classic and introduced in bars across the country and world.

When the cocktail was originally created, mezcal was a rarely used and poorly understood spirit by many US bartenders. Even when Ward created the Oaxaca Old-Fashioned, it was only the third cocktail in which he used it. The first was a simple Daiquiri, the second was a drink called the Cinder, a Daiquiri twist.

In an interview with Punch, Kaplan, the owner of Death & Co. said, “Phil rarely seemed to tweak drinks. They were always presented as complete, formed thoughts, even if it was his first pass at it.”

Classic Old Fashioned Recipe

Ingredients

1/2 teaspoon honey syrup
3 dashes aromatic bitters (Angostura or similar)
1 teaspoon water
2 ounces bourbon or rye whiskey
Garnish: orange peel

Steps

  1. Add the syrup, bitters, and water into a rocks glass.
  2. Stir until combined.
  3. Fill the glass with ice cubes.
  4. Add whiskey and stir until combined.
  5. Take orange peel, squeezing oil into cockail.
  6. Garnish with orange peel.

History

Why is the Old Fashioned such a classic cocktail? Well, as history tells us, the first documented use of the word “cocktail” was in 1806. The Balance and Columbian Repository, a publication in Hudson, New York, wrote that a cocktail was a “concoction of spirits, bitters, water, and sugar,” at the time known as a bittered sling.

Then in 1833, J.E. Alexander describes a similar cocktail he encountered in New York City. He states it as being rum, gin, or brandy, significant water, bitters, sugar, and a nutmeg garnish.

Eventually, the 1850's and 1860's introduced more sophisticated drinkers, and cocktails began to include the addition of other liquors. When someone wanted a simpler drink, it became in-vogue to request an “old-fashioned,” a reference to the basic combination of liquor, water, sugar, and bitters from earlier days.

And even later, The Pendennis Club, a gentlemen's club founded in 1881 in Louisville, Kentucky, claims the old fashioned cocktail was invented there. While this is highly unlikely, they still claim the recipe was invented by one of their bartenders in honor of Colonel James E. Pepper, a prominent bourbon distiller. Pepper then introduced New York to the Old Fashioned via the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel bar.

Regardless of the actual origin of the Old Fashioned, it is difficult to find a more satisfyingly simple cocktail.

Classic Manhattan Recipe

Ingredients

2 ounces bourbon or rye
1 ounce sweet vermouth
3 dashes Bitters Lab Charred Cedar & Currant bitters
Garnish: brandied cherry

Steps

  1. Add all the ingredients into a mixing glass with ice, and stir until well-chilled.
  2. Strain into a chilled coupe.
  3. Garnish with a brandied cherry.

History

The Manhattan, as with many classic cocktails, is surrounded by quite a bit of lore. It is said that it was invented in the late 1870s or early 1880s in the Manhattan Club in New York (thus the name). It is said it was invented by Dr. Iain Marshall during a banquet honoring presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden.

There are prior references to similar cocktail recipes also called a “Manhattan.” Some say it was invented earlier, in the 1860s, by a bartender named Black at a bar on Broadway.

Additionally, another record of the cocktail can be found later in William Schmidt's The Flowing Bowl, published in 1891. In it, he details a drink containing 2 dashes of gum syrup, 2 dashes of bitters, 1 dash of absinthe, ​23 portion of whiskey, and ​13 portion of vermouth.